Size does not matter

In tennis, height seems to be an important factor in success in tennis. Not that a greater height means you have better cards, but that being in a range of approximately 1.85m to 1.95m means you have the best cards. Too much of any good thing is after all a bad thing. It is perhaps no co-incidence that the top three tennis players in history, in terms of grand slams won, are 1.85m in height (Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, and Pete Sampras), and that the fourth greatest player (Novak Djokovic) is 1.88m. Players falling below this range seem doomed - they would be naturally relatively weaker, since they lack the dangerous assets of a big forehand and a powerful serve which typically comes from a greater-than-necessary height which arguably compensates for their naturally relatively lesser dexterity. This cannot be more wrong, for the greater dexterity which comes with being shorter than necessary could too be an asset.

That being said, this match seems to disprove whatever I just said

In this US Open round, Roger Federer came face to face with a certain Bjorn Phau. Most of you may not have heard about him, but he is known for his speed and dexterity. These attributes, undoubtedly related to his less-than-desirable-tennis-height, however did not serve as an asset for he was wiped off the court in no difficult as can be seen in the highlights above.

That being said and shown, these two persons seem to prove my point right...

They go by the name of

Kei Nishikori

Diego Schwartzman

Kei Nishikori has not let his height stopped him from establishing himself inside in the ATP top 10, securing wins against the Top 4 and threatening to beat them whenever they clash, and reaching a grand slam final. The difference from them, apart from a small difference in height (0.03) was Nishikori's ability to translate his dexterity into an offensive weapon. He strikes the ball cleaner than average (in fact we would argue that such striking ability surpasses that of Federer or Djokovic). In other words, he makes fuller use of his 'short gifts'.

Concerning Diego Schwartzan, although he is yet to produce the results that Nishikori has, we have been impressed by his recent performance in the grand slams, particularly his offensive style of play at the French Open 2018. He was able to maneuver himself to hit outrageous shots from positions even more outrageous, most distinctively the forehand shot down-the-line with him contacting the ball mid-air and slanting whole-bodily to his right. Him being the only person to took at least a set off Nadal throughout the entire championship has to be credited mainly to such impressive offensive display.

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